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Wikipedia says a force is any interaction that, when unopposed, will change the motion of an object. But in a site i find this , force is a "quantitative" description of an interaction that causes a change in an object's motion.Which is the better definition?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by sammy gerbil, stafusa, Cosmas Zachos, ZeroTheHero, Jon Custer Jun 12 '18 at 1:47

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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The two definitions are equivalent if the motion is seen by an inertial observer. But, with respect to an observer motionless on the Earth surface, "something changing the motion of an object" will include the centrifugal and Coriolis forces, and one would be hard-pressed to call those "interactions", as that would not be in the same sense as gravitational or electrostatic interactions e.g.

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I think that wikipidea's definition is better because accroding to the second definition force changes the state of motion of the object which is not necessarily true becuase sometimes the force is not strong enough to change the state of motion of an object. According to me the simplest definition of force would be :- A push or a pull which tries to change the state of motion of an object is called force.

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  • $\begingroup$ yes but is the quantity of this push or the push ? for example volume is the quantity of space not the space. $\endgroup$ – ado Jun 7 '18 at 9:55
  • $\begingroup$ In case of force both this push and the push are correct beacuse in volume, space can relate to many different things but in case of push it always relates to force. $\endgroup$ – The Mathemagician Jun 7 '18 at 10:17

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