0
$\begingroup$

I need to Know. Is it a condition that Probability density is bounded between 0 and 1?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I plotted a probability density versus the position and I got the maximum of the probability to be 1.25 $\endgroup$ – Ahmed M. Farouk Jun 4 '18 at 14:14
  • $\begingroup$ This is a question about mathematics (probability) not physics. $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil Jun 4 '18 at 14:18
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @sammygerbil Hmm... Is a question about quantum probabilities a mathematical question or a physics question? I think this is an important realization for people who are learning to do QM calculations. +1 $\endgroup$ – Bill N Jun 4 '18 at 14:43
  • $\begingroup$ @BillN Is the question "What is 1+1=?" a question about physics just because addition is used in every branch of physics? The context of QM is not relevant to this question, and for that reason I think it is mathematics not physics. $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil Jun 4 '18 at 15:02
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @sammygerbil Just because a question is off-topic here doesn't mean it is on-topic somewhere else. Please don't vote to migrate bad/unclear questions. Rather, just vote to close, but leave it here. Cheers! $\endgroup$ – AccidentalFourierTransform Jun 4 '18 at 15:50
4
$\begingroup$

It is not. For example, a uniform distribution in the interval $[0,1/2]$ has a probability density of $2$ everywhere in that interval.

Along the same lines, a uniform distribution in the interval $[0,1/n]$ has a probability density of $n$ everywhere in that interval, for any positive $n$. So probability density has no upper bound at all.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.