-1
$\begingroup$

How is Newton 1st law still true if you throw a baseball and it doesn’t keep? Shouldn’t it never stop?

$\endgroup$

closed as unclear what you're asking by sammy gerbil, stafusa, Jon Custer, ZeroTheHero, M. Enns May 25 '18 at 11:24

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2
$\begingroup$

Your question is a good one, and its being asked at the right time of year, Baseball season! In outer space, for example, the ball may go forever unless it hits another object (star, planet, comet). On earth, things are obviously different. The frictional force between the ball and the atmosphere will continuously work to slow down the ball since that frictional force acts in the direction opposite the motion. Gravity is also always acting on the ball. This force of attraction acts on the ball pulling it towards the center of the earth, or down in this example. When the gravitational attraction finally pulls the ball down to the surface, then there is a frictional force between the ball and the ground. This frictional force, like the other, is against the direction of motion. This force will finally bring the ball to rest. There are other factors, such as if the ball bounces when hitting the ground, but I think this answers your question.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

The baseball is subject to forces such as friction or air resistance. Earth's gravity affects it as well.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.