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Most everyone knows how rust is formed but just to remind you when iron is exposed to oxygen and moisture for extended periods of time. Now if we were to apply much more pressure to the environment would this increase rusting rates? I believe that it would but another aspect would be the temperature during the process. Would a higher or lower temperature effect how it rusts? I have done thorough research but have not found much on this topic that fits my question.

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I think this question is better fit in chemistry stackexchange, but nevertheless here is a solution:

Specifically for iron, the chemical equation for its rusting is $$4\text{Fe}+3\text{O}_2\to 2\text{Fe}_2\text{O}_3$$ At STP, $\Delta H=-824.2\ \text{kJ}/\text{mol}$. Therefore, by Le Chatelier's principle adding pressure would shift the reaction to the right (more rust), and adding heat would shift it to the left (less rust).

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    $\begingroup$ I think that you're right in saying that Le Chatelier's principle would tend to shift the reaction towards the left with increasing temperature. However, in practice there is also the matter of kinetics. So if you were to moderately raise the temperature from room temperature, although the driving force to the right may be reduced by Le Chatelier's principle, the kinetics would increase with temperature, so the overall rusting rate may increase. I think that this is consistent with common observations that rusting occurs more quickly in warm, humid conditions than cool humid conditions. $\endgroup$
    – user93237
    May 14, 2018 at 23:51

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