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I am 14 years old and I think I have a good grasp on physics but I have a question. Imagine you were to shrink everything in the universe (except for yourself) down to the size of an atom and it was on your finger. Now, if you move your hand, would everything in the shrunken "universe" be going faster than the speed of light?

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closed as off-topic by StephenG, WillO, stafusa, Kyle Kanos, By Symmetry May 10 '18 at 11:49

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "We deal with mainstream physics here. Questions about the general correctness of unpublished personal theories are off topic, although specific questions evaluating new theories in the context of established science are usually allowed. For more information, see Is non mainstream physics appropriate for this site?." – StephenG, stafusa, Kyle Kanos, By Symmetry
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ A common mistake is thinking that the speed of light is a technical limitation. As a result, many people, including you, think of creative ways to bypass this limit. You think that there is such a speed that is faster than ligh and we just need to get creative to achieve it. This is incorrect. There is no such a speed in our spacetime. It is counterintuitive, unless you study hyperbolic geometry, but let me give you a parallel. Can we move farther to the North from the North Pole? No. Is it a tachnical limitation that we could creatively overcome? No. Such a place simply doesn't exist. $\endgroup$ – safesphere May 10 '18 at 6:41
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If you had an atom-sized object with the mass of the universe, it would be a black hole. With it on your fingertip, you'd be within its event horizon. Hypothetical physics questions just stopped being the most pressing matter in your mind.

Also, moving it would be extremely difficult due to its huge mass.

Ignoring the above, the fact of the matter is that you have a very small object, not a very large object that you can magically move around very fast. Light speed barriers remain intact.

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