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I red this sentence on "D.J. Griffiths, Introduction to Quantum Mechanics" talking about the using of heavy particles for the experiment.

"...heavy so we can construct localized wave packets and treat the motion in terms of classical particle trajectories".

Someone can deepen the subject? I have never used this "approximation" and I do not know on what principles is based on.

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Because the mass is large the momentum is large, so the wavelength is short ($\lambda=h/p$ ) and one does not have to consider diffraction and interference as the particles pass through slits in the apparatus.

Alternatively and equivalently: we measure where the particles are so we have an uncertainty in their momentum, $\Delta p \approx \hbar /\Delta x$, but as the mass is large this only leads to a small uncertainty in their velocity.

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