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If Hydrogen and an 'anti-Helium' come together will we get a hydrogen and a photon?

I was wondering if antiparticles can be used to fuel some nuclear reactions and used to develop particles which require extreme amounts of energy like Higgs Boson.

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  • $\begingroup$ Look at your net residual baryon and lepton numbers. You have completely messed it up. $\endgroup$ – Cosmas Zachos May 4 '18 at 12:54
  • $\begingroup$ Particle-antiparticle colliders have been tried. As I understand it, there are a number of practical and theoretical advantages, but you can't get the same "luminosity" with them, especially at high energies, because it's too hard to produce enough antiparticles. And they always use matching particle-antiparticle pairs. $\endgroup$ – zwol May 4 '18 at 15:17
  • $\begingroup$ see the equivalent aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.2977852 $\endgroup$ – anna v May 5 '18 at 5:26
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Well considering your statement "particles of different masses" the equation \begin{align*} E=mc^2 \end{align*} tells us that the particle with more mass will be left behind, here many outcomes possible a new particle can also be formed however chances are very less or you can also get other particles maybe even some bosons for a glimpse of time but getting a full hydrogen atom is actually well... really really hard from that reaction as matter and anti-matter reactions don't work in that manner but the light beam speculation stands pretty solid.

And it is possible from conversion of anti-matter and matter to get energy to run experiments and absorb those energy (in the form of gamma ray photons) then use the heat that would be converted by that material to run some sort of nuclear power plants,that could in return be used to run various experiments to create bosons including the higgs boson but i suppose it is not possible to create them directly.But from anti matter only it is possible from future technologies but from present it is very unlike that we will be able to undergo fusion as the anti-hydrogen atoms are very unstable and scientists have only recently been able preserve them long enough to study their properties.

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  • $\begingroup$ By only from anti matter i meant that from anti-matter seperately and didn't mean that matter cannot involve in a fusion reaction. It really makes me happy to be able to use this higher level knowledge to answer people's questions as a 8th grader because there is no application of these knowledge at this level. $\endgroup$ – Mythical Miner May 4 '18 at 12:28
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A fundamental particle will not annihilate a different type of fundamental antiparticle. For instance, an electron plus an antimuon makes muonium, not gamma rays. (It only lasts until the antimuon decays into an antielectron, of course.)

Nuclei are not fundamental; they're composites of protons and neutrons, which are themselves composites of up and down quarks. Collisions between composite particles are messy, for basically the same reason that collisions between cars are messy compared to collisions between solid steel balls. If you collide an antiproton (${}^1\mbox{H}$ anti-nucleus) with an alpha particle (${}^4\mbox{He}$ nucleus), then the antiproton can annihilate one of the protons in the alpha particle; but it doesn't necessarily have to, because the quarks and antiquarks might not line up neatly for that to happen. You might just get a regular collision without any annihilations, or you might lose up and down quarks from different nucleons, at which point I think the entire thing comes apart into a pion shower.

If it does annihilate neatly, formally the result is a tritium nucleus, but the energy released in the process would probably be enough to break it up, so you'd get one free proton, two free neutrons, and some gammas.

I'm sure this experiment has been done, but I don't know the right search keywords to find the writeup.

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