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As particles fall into a black hole they accelerate and thus the mass of the Planck star increases. The more the star grows, the stronger its gravitational pull and thus the same particle will add more and more mass to the star as the star grows.

Is there a point in which every particle that enters the event horizon of the Planck star makes its radius increase faster than its Schwartzchild radius?

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No. If one goes by the paper postulating the Planck star it suggests that the star radius scales like $\sim (m/m_p)^n l_p$ where $n>0$ and at least naively $n=1/3$. But the Schwarzschild radius scales as $2Gm/c^2$, growing faster unless $n>1$. They do consider the $n=1$ case, but since $l_p/m_p \approx 7.43\times 10^{-28}$ and $2G/c^2\approx 4.45\times 10^{-19}$ you will not reach the Schwarzschild radius.

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  • $\begingroup$ Seems to me like a good way to reset the universe. I.e., have a Planck star start to grow faster and faster, with its event horizon growing in front of it. Inside, there's a big bang. $\endgroup$ – Eduardo Sahione Apr 4 '18 at 0:27

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