0
$\begingroup$

Why is the equation of a progressive harmonic wave given as y=asin(wt-kx)? At each point on the wave, wouldn't the value of (wt-kx) always be 0?

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ What makes you think it will be zero? $\endgroup$ – SmarthBansal Mar 27 '18 at 10:40
  • $\begingroup$ wt=(2*pi/T)*(x/v) kx=(2*pi/lambda)*x, lambda=vT $\endgroup$ – vaanchit kaul Mar 27 '18 at 10:52
0
$\begingroup$

Set x=0 (this means you are looking at the point in space where x=0).

Then y(x=0) = a sin(w*t) . So at this point, it is clear that the value of the quantity you are observing will vary periodically.You can perform a similar reasoning for every point in space.

Actually, you can also perform a similar reasoning by setting the instant t and observing the "shape" of the wave in space.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.