-4
$\begingroup$

If: $$ \mathrm{force} = Q \times 2.00\rm \:N = 20.0\:N$$ then what does $Q$ equal?

What are the appropriate units for $Q$ so the value of the force comes out with the correct units of newtons?

$\endgroup$

closed as off-topic by Mike, Emilio Pisanty, AccidentalFourierTransform, stafusa, sammy gerbil Mar 13 '18 at 1:55

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Homework-like questions should ask about a specific physics concept and show some effort to work through the problem. We want our questions to be useful to the broader community, and to future users. See our meta site for more guidance on how to edit your question to make it better" – Mike, Emilio Pisanty, AccidentalFourierTransform, stafusa
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Is there some reason $Q=10$ doesn't work? Can you explain your why or why not? $\endgroup$ – Mike Mar 12 '18 at 17:19
  • $\begingroup$ Q = 10 does work, but what are the units of Q? 10 of what? Newtons? Kilograms? meters/s^2? Is there a unit for the value of Q? $\endgroup$ – Jack Mar 12 '18 at 17:23
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Alternatively, is Q unit-less? $\endgroup$ – Jack Mar 12 '18 at 17:24
  • $\begingroup$ Think through it for yourself. If $Q=10\,\mathrm{N}$, then what units does $Q \times 2.00\,\mathrm{N}$ have? How about $Q=10\,\mathrm{kg}$ or $Q=10\,\mathrm{m}/\mathrm{s}^2$? What if $Q$ is dimensionless? We can't do your thinking for you. I assume you're learning about dimensional analysis. What have you learned so far? $\endgroup$ – Mike Mar 12 '18 at 17:30
  • $\begingroup$ I was using those units for question clarification, as you requested. They are not possible solutions. This was a question put forth on a physics assignment dealing with forces and accelerations. $\endgroup$ – Jack Mar 12 '18 at 17:44
0
$\begingroup$

Well, not the way you posted it but, a Force is a vector quantity. So $10 * \vec 20.0 N$ is a valid "scalar - vector multiplication". So it's totally valid for $Q = 10$, as a scalar, dimentionless.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.