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If: $$ \mathrm{force} = Q \times 2.00\rm \:N = 20.0\:N$$ then what does $Q$ equal?

What are the appropriate units for $Q$ so the value of the force comes out with the correct units of newtons?

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    $\begingroup$ Is there some reason $Q=10$ doesn't work? Can you explain your why or why not? $\endgroup$ – Mike Mar 12 '18 at 17:19
  • $\begingroup$ Q = 10 does work, but what are the units of Q? 10 of what? Newtons? Kilograms? meters/s^2? Is there a unit for the value of Q? $\endgroup$ – Jack Mar 12 '18 at 17:23
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    $\begingroup$ Alternatively, is Q unit-less? $\endgroup$ – Jack Mar 12 '18 at 17:24
  • $\begingroup$ Think through it for yourself. If $Q=10\,\mathrm{N}$, then what units does $Q \times 2.00\,\mathrm{N}$ have? How about $Q=10\,\mathrm{kg}$ or $Q=10\,\mathrm{m}/\mathrm{s}^2$? What if $Q$ is dimensionless? We can't do your thinking for you. I assume you're learning about dimensional analysis. What have you learned so far? $\endgroup$ – Mike Mar 12 '18 at 17:30
  • $\begingroup$ I was using those units for question clarification, as you requested. They are not possible solutions. This was a question put forth on a physics assignment dealing with forces and accelerations. $\endgroup$ – Jack Mar 12 '18 at 17:44
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Well, not the way you posted it but, a Force is a vector quantity. So $10 * \vec 20.0 N$ is a valid "scalar - vector multiplication". So it's totally valid for $Q = 10$, as a scalar, dimentionless.

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