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Can i in any way force a hydrogen atom to have three electrons? Two electrons in first shell and one in the second?

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The double hydrogen anion H$^{--}$ does not exist as a stable species. (It occurs as a resonance, with a lifetime of 23 ns though.) If you tried to add another electron to a H$^{-}$ ion, the repulsion from the two core 1$s$ electrons would be greater than the attraction due to the nucleus. The result is that there is no bound 2$s$ energy level.

In fact, there is not even a bound $1s^{1}2s^{1}$ state of H$^{-}$. Even with only two electrons total, there is not a bound 2$s$ orbital.

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    $\begingroup$ I’m not sure there are any doubly negative ions that is stable. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Mar 8 '18 at 2:18

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