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I have been having trouble with my vision. blurry and shadows. I realized that when I use a hand held mirror to see the back of my hair that is being reflected by another mirror behind my back I can see so much clearer. why is this? Eye dr. has not been able to help me so far.

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  • $\begingroup$ Probably that this is giving you a very small field of view. Your vision on-axis is probably better. Try holding an opaque card with a small hole upto your eye - you will see a similar effect $\endgroup$ – Martin Beckett Mar 4 '18 at 2:58
  • $\begingroup$ Has the optician ruled out that you need eyeglasses? It's not implausible that the mirrors may be slightly imperfect and are introducing some optical correction that matches a defect in your vision. Also, what happens if you try to look at other things through the two mirrors? Also, are you looking through the mirrors with both eyes forward and the mirror at a reasonable distance, or are you pulling your eyes to one side (which can introduce correction), or maybe using only one eye (which is better than the other)? $\endgroup$ – Steve Mar 4 '18 at 3:17
  • $\begingroup$ I have been to the same eye doctor that did Lasik surgery on my eyes about 20 yr ago . He tested the muscles in my eyes and had me try at least a dozen pr of contacts. no help. I just noticed this with the mirrors in the last week . I could actually see individual hair on the back of my head and can't even see my eyes to apply eyemakeup! .didn't understand why but now will try to look at other images and post that. thanks Martin and Steve! oh, I probably looked from either side and with both eyes forward as well.. I didn't know if it might give an insight to the problem with my vision. $\endgroup$ – scody Mar 4 '18 at 3:31
  • $\begingroup$ If you're farsighted, this makes sense. By looking at objects through two mirrors, you're increasing the distance the light rays travel to get to your eye, so the image would become sharper if your vision improves with distance. $\endgroup$ – probably_someone Mar 4 '18 at 4:16
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What comes first to mind is the fact that the distance from eye to mirror to mirror to back of your head is a relatively long distance. You could try looking at the back of someone else's head (or a printed page or anything else with a lot of detail) at various distances and see if there's a distance at which you see better detail. If that doesn't work, then I would lean toward @Steve 's guess that one of your mirrors might be distorted. You could test that guess by using a different mirror. Either situation would suggest that you need different eyeglasses.

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