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This question already has an answer here:

Andromeda is moving towards the Milky Way Galaxy at around 250,000 mph, but I wonder what is the direction of our Milky Way Galaxy? Are these two galaxies heading towards each other or Andromeda will catch up Milky Way? The Milky Way is moving at approximately 1,400,000 mph.

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marked as duplicate by Kyle Kanos, Rob Jeffries astrophysics Mar 3 '18 at 17:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    $\begingroup$ "Officer, there is no way I crashed into the car in front of me. The universe is expanding and so is the distance between those cars." $\endgroup$ – asdfex Mar 3 '18 at 12:57
  • $\begingroup$ Also a duplicate of physics.stackexchange.com/questions/14657/… $\endgroup$ – Rob Jeffries Mar 3 '18 at 17:36
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Just because the universe is expanding doesn't mean that everything within the universe is moving with the same speed in the same direction. Some galaxies might be faster, some slower, some might even move in the reverse direction, the universe expanding as a whole only means that on average, most astronomical entities are moving away from the "center" of the universe.

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On smaller scales, the gravitational force overcomes the force that is responsible for the overall expansion of the universe. It is this reason why galaxies and solar systems are able form. And to a rarer extent allows for the merger of galaxies.

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