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what is the underlying principle of this boom here? did the boosters landed with speed greater than the sound barrier ? And they were heard after some time they both landed , how is that possible? is it because sound travels slowly as compared to light? please clarify .

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  • $\begingroup$ Actually the final part has nothing to do with light. It means that the boosters covered the distance between the " go infrasonic" point and the landing site / listeners travelling at an average speed bigger than that of sound $\endgroup$ – Alchimista Feb 9 '18 at 21:01
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There are three sonic booms created by the boosters, compared to the usual two of supersonic aircraft. The initial boom occurs at the aft (engine) end, the second boom is created by the landing legs and the third is from the fins near the forward end of the booster.

And they were heard after some time they both landed , how is that possible? is it because sound travels slowly as compared to light? please clarify

Sound at sea level travels at 340 metres per second, compared to light which travels at 299 792 458 metres per second.

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