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The direction of induced emf will be opposite to increasing current ;means that its direction will be opposite to applied voltage. And the direction of induced emf due to decreasing current will be same as that of applied voltage. Ok,now my question is does it mean that direction of induced emf due to increasing current is same as induced emf due to decreasing voltage?

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Applied voltage doesn't enter into it.

In an inductor when current is controlled the induced EMF opposes the change in current.

If you assume a steady state, then the quote is correct, but is does not describe the general situation.

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you please explain exactly what are you saying? I can't get your point $\endgroup$ – Rabik John Feb 7 '18 at 11:17
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In an inductor, the magnitude of the induced emf is proportional to the magnitude of the rate of change of the current (which can be + or -).

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