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Imagine positive helium ion with +1 charge,basically a helium atom with one electron missing.

What if electron with kinetic energy greater than second ionisation energy of helium hit that positive helium ion?

I am torn at what to think,on one side,this is positive ion,its attracting the electron,it wants to "grab" it,connect with it to become full and neutral again.

On other side,this approaching electron have enough kinetic energy to knock out the second/last electron that this positive ion still holds in its orbit.

What will happen in this scenario? Is there multiple possibilities to the outcome? I am thinking maybe the approaching electron will not knock out the orbiting electron,istead it will start orbiting the empty orbit of that ion and its kinetic energy will be released in form of photon.

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    $\begingroup$ With sufficient energy, one can indeed keep ionizing elements. Completely stripping down to bare nuclei is possible and commonly done. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Feb 6, 2018 at 19:22
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    $\begingroup$ And also radiative electron capture is possible. It is the inverse process of photoemission. $\endgroup$
    – user137289
    Feb 6, 2018 at 19:31

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If you have an ionized He atom with only one electron, you can definitely remove the remaining bound electron with an incoming electron with sufficiently high kinetic energy.

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