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We know that gravity works at an infinite distance. By Einstein's theory of gravity it is the result of space time curvature. So can we say that the curvature is infinitely long? How can this be even possible? Can something be infinite?

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Infinities are attributes of classical frameworks, and general relativity has not been definitively quantized yet. Infinities disappear when effective quantization is used.

The effective quantizations used in cosmological models assumes the existence of gravitons, elementary particles of spin 2, that are the (to be proven) gauge bosons of gravity. These have zero mass and thus travel with the velocity of light c. This transfers the infinity to the coordinate systems used , approached with the velocity of light because the gravitational field in a quantized version cannot travel faster than c.

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  • $\begingroup$ why are they theorised to have a spin of 2? $\endgroup$ – Alex Robinson Feb 5 '18 at 10:45
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    $\begingroup$ It fits smoothly to the gauge theories of the standard model and macroscopically explains mathematically why we only have attractive gravity and not repulsive $\endgroup$ – anna v Feb 5 '18 at 10:47
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    $\begingroup$ But graviton's existence can be denied.I asked a question and showed a logic that they can't exist.physics.stackexchange.com/questions/381161/… see here. $\endgroup$ – Theoretical Feb 5 '18 at 10:52
  • $\begingroup$ @AsifIqubal that is not a proof, you were told that by anna v then aswell $\endgroup$ – Alex Robinson Feb 5 '18 at 10:57
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry.... But I presented a logic against graviton.And Anna didn't present any clear logic. $\endgroup$ – Theoretical Feb 5 '18 at 11:20

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