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This question already has an answer here:

I usually start my car remotely and let it warm up before I leave for work. This morning I forgot to start my car beforehand, so I had to scrape the ice off the windows. I was surprised to find frost on the inside of the windshield. This has never happened to me before. As I have no actual education in physics, can someone explain to me?

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marked as duplicate by sammy gerbil, Chris, John Rennie, Kyle Kanos, Jon Custer Jan 24 '18 at 13:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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The warm steam inside the car undergoes deposition as it come into touch with the windshield. For this to happen, the humidity inside the car cannot be too low.

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  • $\begingroup$ Not sure it goes straight from gas to ice. You get fog (liquid) on the inside of the window in cold weather. But this may be right. I did not down vote. $\endgroup$ – paparazzo Jan 23 '18 at 23:14
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It is air on the inside and outside and a cold window. Inside frist is not as common as inside of the car is protected (warmer). Inside also does not get rained or snowed on.

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