3
$\begingroup$

Oscillating an object in water creates waves in it. Oscillating an object in air can creates sound waves. Likewise by making something (something which interacts with the field) oscillate in the electromagnetic field can electromagnetic waves be produced?

$\endgroup$

2 Answers 2

4
$\begingroup$

Yes, this is exactly what happens when a radio antenna is used for transmission. Electrons moving along the antenna's wires accellerate back and forth, and this produces electromagnetic waves.

The photon energy at radio frequencies is quite small, so it is difficult to measure quantum phenomena at these frequencies. However that does not mean the wave is not quantized.

$\endgroup$
4
$\begingroup$

Yes. That's basically the only way that electromagnetic waves can be produced. Charged particles interact with the electromagnetic field, and accelerating charges produces electromagnetic waves.

Strictly speaking, electromagnetic radiation can be produced whenever a charge changes state. Classically, this only corresponds to true physical acceleration, but when quantum mechanics enters the picture it also includes annihilation of charges and such.

$\endgroup$
12
  • $\begingroup$ Well is there any constraint that oscillations with only certain amplitude is required? $\endgroup$ Jan 20, 2018 at 7:02
  • $\begingroup$ have a look antenna-theory.com/basics/whyantennasradiate.php $\endgroup$
    – anna v
    Jan 20, 2018 at 7:10
  • $\begingroup$ @Saptarshisarma Not really. Different amplitudes will change the electromagnetic wave you get, but any oscillation of a charge will give you electromagnetic waves $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Jan 20, 2018 at 7:31
  • $\begingroup$ Then just charging an object and moving it would do the job?? $\endgroup$ Jan 20, 2018 at 7:32
  • $\begingroup$ @Saptarshisarma Yep $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Jan 20, 2018 at 7:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.