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Why doesn't energy rely on time, but only changes for an object in motion?

Say you are pushing an object as you walk, and your arm bone can exert 1,001 N (I made up this number) of force before breaking, using KE = 1/2mv^2 the energy exerted by and on it increases with speed if 1,000 N is constantly applied, but the force never changes. Does this mean that you can exert more energy on something without exerting more force on it, and having no change in stress levels? How or how not?

Also, similarly, since kinetic energy increases faster than force when pushing an object then what role does energy really play in it?

High school AP physics grade 11

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  • $\begingroup$ You're missing something by saying that "kinetic energy is caused by force". And I think this is a possible duplicate of this question $\endgroup$ – HsMjstyMstdn Jan 12 '18 at 4:07
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Yes. Power, which is energy supplied per unit time, is speed*force. So as the speed increases the pusher must supply more power to keep the force constant. That's why its easy to push a car 1mph but hard to push it 10mph. For a constant force accelerating a constant mass, the speed increases linearly with time. So the power increases linearly. If you take the time derivative of the kinetic energy that's the power required and if the acceleration, the dv/dt factor, is a constant then you see that it's proportional to v. "Kinetic energy increases faster than force" is meaningless. If the force is constant and the object moves then distance increases faster than force too. If you pushed on a tree and it didn't move would you say its speed increased slower than force?

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