0
$\begingroup$

This question already has an answer here:

I am new to subject static electricity and I really got confused by some questions?

  1. if the electrons in insulators are tightly bound to the nucleus why when rubbing two insulators electron jump from one to another?

  2. in conducting wires when an electron jump from one atom to another they repel each other and form an electrical current but why when electron transfer from one insulator to another the the electrons from the second insulator doesn't repel the electron transferred from first insulator?

$\endgroup$

marked as duplicate by John Rennie, stafusa, M. Enns, sammy gerbil, Jon Custer Jan 8 '18 at 20:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

0
$\begingroup$
  1. Static electricity is the electrical insulators is due to the build up of static charge. Because of the triboelectric effect, electrons are able to be passed from one object to another, even if they are insulators. However, they remain charged as they do not allow the flow of charged particles(protons or electrons), hence build up static charge. This results in the phenomenon of static electricity. There are 3 more ways that static electricity can be induced, namely the piezoelectric effect, pyroelectric effect, and electrostatic induction. However, these ways are not how rubbing 2 insulators together form static electricity.

  2. As mentioned above, the electrons passed from one electrical insulator to another via the triboelectric effect. However, the charged particle is unable to pass through the electrical insulator as the insulator does not allow electrons to flow easily from one atom to another within the insulator.

$\endgroup$