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Like in nuclear physics we deal with binding energies, i heard someone saying Chemical binding energy. What is that and how a chemical reaction follows mass energy interconversion based on this concept like a nuclear reaction follows?

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marked as duplicate by Bill N, John Rennie, stafusa, Kyle Kanos, Jon Custer Jan 7 '18 at 16:39

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Chemical binding energies are all to do with atoms being bound together and are of order of magnitude electron volts $(1 \rm eV \approx 1.6 \times 10^{-19} \rm J)$ whereas nuclear binding energies are order of magnitude a million times larger. In chemistry it is usual to measure that quantity in terms of a mole of bonds rather than per one bond.
This means that the change in mass during a chemical reaction is a million times smaller than that for a nuclear reaction.

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