1
$\begingroup$

If an electron taken alone by oscillating produce an electromagnetic wave. Can a collection of atoms, i.e., in my case a stone produce an electromagnetic wave/ electromagnetic radiation if we oscillate it?

Any stone is composed of atoms. Any atoms is composed of electrons , protons and neutrons, so according to classical theory that any accelerating charge produces an electromagnetic wave then a stone can also produce one as it is oscillating the electric field produced by itself? Wouldn't it? Please help

How it is different from the existing question:

The previous question defines itself as electrically neutral. Here, I don't fully understand the idea behind the term electrically neutral. I agree in fact that the AMOUNT of positive charge is equal to the negative charge. But I don't understand how it stops from oscillating the electric field that itself produced.

The point is if this is true we should have this effect when Faraday experimented with a stone instead of a bar magnet or if I'm missing something in my understanding, please help.

$\endgroup$

marked as duplicate by John Rennie, Qmechanic Dec 31 '17 at 12:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of Do composite particles that are electrically neutral but have charged constituents radiate? $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Dec 31 '17 at 11:22
  • $\begingroup$ Does the stone have a field? $\endgroup$ – Pieter Dec 31 '17 at 11:31
  • $\begingroup$ Any stone is composed of atoms. Any atoms is composed of electrons , protons and neutrons, so according to classical theory that any accelerating charge produces an electromagnetic wave then a stone can also produce one as it is oscillating the electric field produced by itself? Wouldn't it? Please help $\endgroup$ – Jyotishraj Thoudam Jan 1 '18 at 12:13
  • $\begingroup$ @JohnRennie Please help me out on this! $\endgroup$ – Jyotishraj Thoudam Jan 1 '18 at 12:27
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, but the negative charges generate exactly the opposite wave as the positive. The result is that there is no wave. $\endgroup$ – user259412 Jan 1 '18 at 14:12
0
$\begingroup$

Electromagnetic radiation by an accelerated stone seems possible, for example, due to piezoelectric effect. The following article may be relevant:

http://nopr.niscair.res.in/bitstream/123456789/34906/1/IJMS%2044%289%29%201275-1281.pdf (Indian Journal of Geo-Marine Science, 44(9), 1275) :

"The experiment on granite ... showed that the electric field strength is linearly and positively correlated with the stress rate. ... the experimental results from granite [compared] with those from non-piezoelectric rock ... confirmed that piezoelectricity is the most important mechanism leading to electromagnetic signals during rock ruptures."

So stress in the stone caused by its acceleration seems to be able to cause electric field, which is variable in case of oscillation, so it can cause electromagnetic radiation.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Link-only answers are discouraged. Please at least provide a summary of the paper or quote the relevant paragraph(s), otherwise this will likely be deleted. $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Jan 1 '18 at 13:49

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.