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Well, I am finding Electromagnetic induction pretty hard.I have read that in a coil when the magnetic flux changes an e.m.f is induced in the coil. But I fail to understand how"exactly"does the change in the magnetic flux makes the electrons in the coil move. I mean what happens inside the coil i.e. What happens internally in the coil due to magnetic field? What actually pushes the electrons and how? Í need a physical explainable for this not mathematical derivation. I have tried to find answer to this but all I got is lengthy answers full of equations . So I Prefer answers without too much equations.

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When you insert a magnet into a coil of wire, you change the magnetic flux. What this means is that you change the magnetic field strength for a given cross section of the coil.

Maxwell’s equations (specifically, Faraday-Lenz law) tells us that when a magnetic field changes, that creates an electric field.

In this case, the electric field is created inside the wire. The electrons in the metal respond to this field, causing them to move and thus creating a current.

This magnetic field created by this current opposes the original change in magnetic flux, which is a consequence of energy conservation.

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