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So I've seen a number of answers/questions pointing out that massive objects which aren't black holes don't emit Hawking radiation. This certainly seems right for the steady state case with a time invariant gravitational field.

However, what happens as a star starts collapsing into a black-hold before any actual event horizon is realized? Does the changing gravitational field somehow create a net flow of radiation out of the collapsing region?

Or to put the point differently is gravitational collapse (whether or not into a blackhole) slowed ever so slightly by a Hawking radiation style effect?

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  • $\begingroup$ Doesn't Hawking radiation require an event horizon? Are you perhaps refering to Unruh radiation? $\endgroup$ – flippiefanus Dec 21 '17 at 10:37
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A partial answer (seemingly yes) is suggested by the comments on this question. I would have marked my question as a duplicate but no one has actually answered that question just given a few comments.

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