1
$\begingroup$

Is it possible to detect the passage of a photon that passes across (orthogonal ) the detector line of sight , without the photon interacting directly with the detector or being reflected towards the detector by an intermediate event. Can the electromagnetic field associated with the photon peripherally trigger a detection, leaving the photons path unaltered?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ There is no distinction between "a photon" and "the electromagnetic field associated with the photon." They are the same object. $\endgroup$ – probably_someone Dec 18 '17 at 19:40
1
$\begingroup$

If you have "no interaction" with the detector, the detector will not "detect" the passage of the photon. The same holds true for the passage of any fundamental particle and its detector. If, however, your detector detects physical events triggered by the photon, then this interaction occurs via this physical event. An example for this is the scintillation counter for gamma photons. These create energetic electrons in the detector crystal causing luminous photons that are detected via a photomultiplier.

| cite | improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.