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More Details: Is there a spot with antimatter where the repulsive force of its nucleus and the attractive force of the positrons cancel out? As in if I took a heavy antimatter atom, ionized it, would there be a scenario in which electrons get attracted to the positrons around the anti-atom but cant get close enough due to the repulsive force from the nucleus, so it just sits around it unable to get closer but still attracted?

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  • $\begingroup$ Instantaneous down-vote upon posting this, I shall persist! If someone is going to down vote this please tell me my error and why you downvoted so I at least know what i am doing wrong here. If not for this stack exchange but perhaps for others. I insist, beg, whatever, that I know my mistake. Being told you have made a mistake without telling what that mistake was is horrendously frustrating! It makes me think the only mistake I made was being here in the first place... $\endgroup$ – Terran Dec 2 '17 at 1:16
  • $\begingroup$ Honestly, the whole second paragraph is offputting- I'd remove it if I were you. Not my downvote though. $\endgroup$ – Chris Dec 2 '17 at 1:20
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, I was worried about that too, I have made the modification. $\endgroup$ – Terran Dec 2 '17 at 1:25
  • $\begingroup$ "... the only mistake I made was being here in the first place..." - You are correct. No one is welcome here. I feel the same way every day. Read this and, if you are smart, you'll know the reason: physics.meta.stackexchange.com/q/6754 $\endgroup$ – safesphere Dec 2 '17 at 5:05
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If you start with neutral antimatter atom, then you would have to add positrons in order to make it positively charged so that it would attract electrons. While it would be possible to then add electrons to an orbital, that electron would quickly find a positron and annihilate, leaving behind the original atom.

Matter-antimatter systems have been created in labs, the simplest being positronium, consisting of an electron and a positron orbiting each other. This "atom" lasts an average of 0.125 nanoseconds before annihilating into photons.

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  • $\begingroup$ Oh just realized what you said, it would indeed need more positrons to attract electrons. Does create a paradox though, if it had less positrons would it repel electrons more than it attracts other matter nuclei (having to push through the electrons), but it probably would still end up being unstable as it would slowely get ionized by fast moving electrons. I do wonder if it would be an easier experiment to do this in reverse, try to stabilize matter in an antimatter environment in a similar fashion. Well I guess that would be something to find out in the future. Thanks for the responce! $\endgroup$ – Terran Dec 2 '17 at 1:32
  • $\begingroup$ @Terran Similar experiments have been ongoing: home.cern/about/updates/2014/01/… $\endgroup$ – Mark H Dec 2 '17 at 6:10

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