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Recently, I learnt that there are many, many mathematically consistent set of universal laws.

How would a universe based on a totally different set of laws look like?

What are the mathematical conditions that make a set of laws consistent?

And lastly, why does our universe operates on the laws of physics known to us and not on any other set of laws?

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closed as off-topic by lemon, Kyle Kanos, Kyle Oman, sammy gerbil, Emilio Pisanty Nov 29 '17 at 19:54

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "We deal with mainstream physics here. Questions about the general correctness of unpublished personal theories are off topic, although specific questions evaluating new theories in the context of established science are usually allowed. For more information, see Is non mainstream physics appropriate for this site?." – Kyle Kanos, Kyle Oman, sammy gerbil, Emilio Pisanty
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ I think this is too broad a question. You might read "Flatland" by Edwin A Abbott and consider how difficult eating is in the two dimensional universe even with the laws of physics as they are. There are many other publications and websites which discuss such ideas. geom.uiuc.edu/~banchoff/Flatland $\endgroup$ – Farcher Nov 29 '17 at 11:18
  • $\begingroup$ You've heard wrong. No one knows even one complete set of laws. My personal opinion is that only one set is consistent, but this has not been proven yet. $\endgroup$ – safesphere Nov 29 '17 at 16:20
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"How would a universe based on a totally different set of laws look like?"

Totally different.

"What are the mathematical conditions that make a set of laws consistent?"

The laws must not contradict each other.

"And lastly, why does our universe operates on the laws of physics known to us and not on any other set of laws?"

I'll get back to you on this, after we find out why anything at all exists.

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