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I am working on a project concerning aquaculture and the elimination of living (live) invasive species being transferred from one location to another.

My question is:

Suppose you have a air tight cylinder/tank/vessel that is half full of water. With one pressure gauge above the water line, and another pressure gauge at the bottom of the vessel.

If you then add 100 psi of compressed air to the top of the cylinder,... ... does the pressure in the water also read an additional 100 psi ?

thank you in advance for any replies

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  • $\begingroup$ Short answer: Yes. $\endgroup$ – Chet Miller Nov 28 '17 at 15:45
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For a moment, yes it does add the same overpressure. The gas density will alter, so the altitude of the pressure sensor in the gas may be significant. This presumes the water is liquid, of course.

After a while, in a 'closed cylinder', the gas will partially dissolve in the water, which may lessen the pressure a bit. If something in the water is alive, there may be some chemical composition changes as well.

It is common to calculate pressure under water as a difference from the atmosphere at the water surface (gage pressure) rather than the difference from a vacuum (absolute pressure), but raising the gas pressure above the liquid has the same additive effect on both measurements.

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