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Correct me if this is wrong, if a negatively charged comb reacts to water(ex. tapwater), the water will bend towards the comb because the water molecule has a slight positively charged "side" and because of that the free electrons on the comb and the water molecule will attract to each other.

But what if the comb was positively charged? Will the water still bend towards the comb because the water molecule also has a negatively charged "side"? Will the water bend away from the comb? (Is this because the water molecule is more positively charged than negatively charged?)

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Either a positive or a negative charge will attract a stream of water.

This happens because the charged object causes the water to become polarized. Say you have a negative comb - the positive side of the water molecules are attracted to it and the negative sides are repelled. This makes the positive sided a bit closer to the comb with the result that the attractive positive-negative force is a bit bigger than the repulsive negative-negative force. The net force is attractive.

With a positive charged object the negative sides of the water molecules would be pulled closer and the attractive force would once again be larger than the (positive-positive) repulsive force.

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