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An enormous number of experiments have been done over the years where the experimenters collide nuclei from a particle accelerator with a target. Typically nuclear reactions take place with a very low cross section. This is proof as good as any to most scientists and lay people that fusion is caused by banging nuclei into one another. I would like to propose a different mechanism for why fusion occurs in these experiments, and that is that the nuclei are actually standing still or nearly so, when they fuse. I see it like this; the energy of the projectile nuclei is completely or almost so, transformed into bremsstrahlung as they approach a highly charged target nucleus. In order for this to occur the trajectory must be exactly in the direction of one target nucleus, therefore the low cross section. It's rare simply!

Can someone disprove this model with logic and theory or experimental results?

This is based on the physics of Charles S. Cagle. When a pair of nuclei are very close in momentum space they will have a de Broglie wavelength that is greater than the interparticle distance and become attractively interactive and fuse.

It all boils down to; how do you actually know what is going on inside the lithium crystal that you just irradiated with deuterons and where fusion reactions apparently occurred?

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You write that you think the mechanism for fusion in a beam-target experiment is

that the nuclei are actually standing still or nearly so, when they fuse.

But that would violate conservation of momentum, which is one of the basic symmetries of spacetime.

You could have such a reaction if another particle, such as a photon, carried away the momentum. Which you suggest:

the energy of the projectile nuclei is completely or almost so, transformed into bremsstrahlung as they approach a highly charged target nucleus.

However, those photons would be pretty easy to detect. (Put some steering field downstream to separate charged from neutral particles, and put a photon detector in the neutral path. This sort of bread-and-butter experimental physics is pretty standard.) There certainly is photon production in these sorts of beam-on-target experiments, for the case of fusion, or nucleon transfer, and so on. The details of the energies and momenta of the incoming and outgoing particles aren't consistent with your scenario.

This is based on the physics of Charles S. Cagle.

Oh, that guy. You may want to (re-)read this site policy (but I think this question is okay).

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  • $\begingroup$ "There certainly is photon production in these sorts of beam-on-target experiments, for the case of fusion, or nucleon transfer, and so on." I think it's easy to miss radiation that actually proves that "grind to a halt fusion" is the correct mechanism, in those experiments. First, the fusion events are extraordinarily rare and second the gamma rays from the nuclear reactions also add to the complexity of the situation and also that you have highly charged reaction products e.g. Helium nuclei with huge energies. $\endgroup$ – Sven _Andersson Nov 7 '17 at 21:48
  • $\begingroup$ If you have a specific reaction you're interested in, I can go into more detail --- just link to a paper. $\endgroup$ – rob Nov 8 '17 at 0:42
  • $\begingroup$ "The contingent fact that Maupertuis seems to have been of a strongly emotional personality, often aggressive and arrogant, must have aroused an ambivalent reaction towards him." On the debate about priority for "The principle of least action", page 23 in "Variational Principles in Dynamics and Quantum Theory" Did you ever meet someone today that may resemble Maupertuis? $\endgroup$ – Sven _Andersson Nov 9 '17 at 0:29

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