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Why does charge placed at rest near a current-carrying wire experience no force, but if the charge starts moving then it gets attracted toward the current-carrying wire?

Why doesn't charge get attracted to the current carrying wire despite it being at rest?

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  • $\begingroup$ "charge placed at rest near a current-carrying wire experience no force" It will experience some force of electric kind. Only magnetic part of this force will be zero because of the Lorentz force law. $\endgroup$ Oct 30, 2017 at 21:33

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It is a fact of nature encoded within the system of Maxwell's equations which describe electromagnetic interactions classically.

The definition of charge comes from observations, as well as the definition of the magnetic field.

That a charge is attracted to another charge is a law of nature. That the magnetic dipoles attract and repulse according to their poles is also a law of nature. It can be experimentally shown that a current carrying wire generates a magnetic field, but a charge at rest with the wire does not feel any force. Once the charge is moving it also generates a magnetic field and thus an interaction between a moving charge and the magnetic field occurs.

Going to the underlying particle level , a current is moving charges in a conductor:

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  • $\begingroup$ What if you take another inertial frame in which both the stationary charge seems to move? (Give complete calculation for that please) $\endgroup$ Feb 15, 2022 at 22:36
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Electric current can deviate their path in presence of external electric field .

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