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Two slender, "stalagmite-like" structures -- separated from the main mass of melted now solidified wax -- have formed on the side of my candle, rising considerably above, and below, the level at which the candle is burning. Explanations, theories, speculations, regarding what process or processes could have caused them to form would be much appreciated. [One speculation: rather than having been propelled upward, they were once drips that, relatively distant from the flame, did not subsequently melt as the candle burned down (?)]

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    $\begingroup$ I believe your hypothesis is correct with them being further from the center and early drips as what I have observed candles. Usually there is a curved surface of these drips in the inner side that is clearly observable. Perhaps the manner it re-solidified on the existing candle made it more resilient on melting... $\endgroup$ – Communisty Oct 30 '17 at 13:22
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Yes, you have it. As the candle melts the drips fall down the side and cool. As the candle melts further they are not only further from center, they are separate from the original and they bend further away from the flame allowing them to not melt with the original candle. Types of wax will determine how much this happens as different mixes of waxes will evaporate at their own rate. This may also account for why your candle did this. If one type of wax melts at a lower temp, it will leave behind a harder wax to drip down the side of the candle. Further increasing its ability to stay up. I wonder more about the different effects on air quality, as we know parafin waxes are not good for us, I would like to know how beeswax effects this... but that’s another topic ...

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