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This question already has an answer here:

I have an innocent question. What is time? Can travelling near the speed of light make a person younger relative to others who don't? Then, is there any impact on the body (atoms, molecules etc) of the person who travels at almost light speed? If so, what is the nature of that effect?

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marked as duplicate by sammy gerbil, Kyle Kanos, Jon Custer, WillO, stafusa Oct 28 '17 at 19:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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Special Relativity tells us that time is not absolute, and different observers measure different time intervals depending on their relative motion. Time dilation is not due to an effect on the atoms or molecules that make up an observer, it is due to the geometry of spacetime.

I suggest you pick up a book on special relativity, it will answer all your questions on this topic.

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There is no impact on the person's body. Their time/space has aged normally from their perspective. You'd have a better understanding if you studied basic special relativity.

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