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I have been to wikipedia about intensity of light, and there are at least 20 different ways to classify it. So I guess it boils down to the formula E = hf, which is the energy of a single photon. Now past gamma rays, is there a maximum frequency, hence energy of a photon? How does what we can create in labs compare to what exists in outer space?

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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's a trivia question that doesn't seem to relate to physical principles. $\endgroup$ – David Z Oct 27 '17 at 21:00
  • $\begingroup$ We aren't to discuss physical phenomena in isolation? Without observation we may as well be mathematicians. Seems not fully rational(ised). $\endgroup$ – JMLCarter Oct 27 '17 at 21:34
  • $\begingroup$ In regards to the last question, it's a fairly easy Google search away (e.g., see this PBS article). $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Oct 29 '17 at 19:16
  • $\begingroup$ Also, the first question is a dupe of this question. $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Oct 29 '17 at 19:17
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I'll suggest GRB 110918A, which had a peak luminosity of $L_{iso} = 4.7 × 10^{47}$ Watts. That a ten to the forty-seven - it isn't a typo.

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  • $\begingroup$ If E = hf, can you calculate the frequency from this em source? $\endgroup$ – Paul FitzSimons Oct 27 '17 at 20:57
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    $\begingroup$ No becaue it wasn't a single photon. $\endgroup$ – JMLCarter Oct 27 '17 at 21:00
  • $\begingroup$ To put this answer in an intuitive perspective, our Sun is a bit too light to ever go supernova, but if it did, then its explosion a hundred million miles away, here on Earth would be a billion times brighter that a hydrogen bomb exploding next to one's face. $\endgroup$ – safesphere Oct 28 '17 at 3:59
  • $\begingroup$ JMLCarter --- Is there a maximum frequency of a photon? And how does this relate to Wattage? $\endgroup$ – Paul FitzSimons Oct 29 '17 at 18:19
  • $\begingroup$ Not really. Although it gets complicated, here physics.stackexchange.com/questions/341456/… This question is on hold now. $\endgroup$ – JMLCarter Oct 29 '17 at 19:09

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