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This question already has an answer here:

I have seen wine glasses being filled up with water and played as an instrument. I would like to know the physics behind how these are played. Links and explanations are much welcome. Thanks!

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marked as duplicate by sammy gerbil, stafusa, Jon Custer, heather, Daniel Griscom Oct 28 '17 at 14:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    $\begingroup$ While doing your research on this topic (you have read this or the equivalent correct?) before you asked your question here, what specific physics concept did you form a question about? $\endgroup$ – Alfred Centauri Oct 27 '17 at 19:37
  • $\begingroup$ -1. No research effort. If we can find links, so can you. $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil Oct 27 '17 at 20:52
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A musical wine glass is a complex system, but here is a simplified explanation. The wine glass will ring like a bell if you strike it. the frequency at which it rings depends (primarily) on the stiffness of the glass, its density, and its thickness. If you drag your finger around the rim of the glass, your skin sticks to the glass and stretches until the force you are applying exceeds the maximum that can be sustained by static friction against the glass, and then your finger slips while your skin contracts. This stick-and-slip behavior happens many times a second, and if its frequency is close to the ringing frequency of the glass modeled as a bell, then the act of dragging your finger around the rim causes the vibration of the glass to grow until it begins radiating sound waves that you can hear. adding water to the glass alters the frequency at which it rings and allows you to tune the glass to a specific pitch.

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  • $\begingroup$ sorry, I did not see that this question is identical to one already asked and answered. $\endgroup$ – niels nielsen Oct 27 '17 at 20:34
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Sure, i'll explain it. Have you ever noticed how places like theaters or places where singing or opera is done, the room is shaped kind of weird. especially the ceiling and walls. Its because the shape and thickness of walls and surfaces creat certain tones, and changes to sound. In the case of a wine glass, the curved very thin glass creates it's own effect on sound, so when you tap it, it makes a certain noise. Flinging it to various levels with fluid is the easiest was to change how the "room" is shaped, there fore, changing pitch.

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