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For metals, I've been told that as temperature increases it's resistance increases, due to the lattice vibrating more, and thus there are more collisions with electrons (increasing resistance).

However, for semiconductors (intrinsic), as temperature increases, the conductivity increases as electrons are provided with more energy to jump the forbidden energy gap. Though, compared to metals, semiconductors have strong chemical bonds, and hence, their lattice vibrations are limited (this is why it increases conductance with temperature compared to metals).

Question: Is this why at high temperatures semiconductors decrease resistance but metals increase resistance (lattice vibrations)?

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  • $\begingroup$ No, its all in the carrier concentration. Scattering impacts semiconductors as well, no way around that. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Oct 26, 2017 at 23:44

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"No, its all in the carrier concentration. Scattering impacts semiconductors as well, no way around that." I quote Jon Custer's comment - just to make it clear that this question has been answered.

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