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  • Put some water in a chamber (metal or dialectric)
  • Get all the air out (create 0 atm. vacuum) and seal it
  • Water will start boiling and losing temperature
  • While it's boiling it produces energy from motion (boiling)
  • The surrounding environment will keep warming up the water in the chamber and keep the boiling going

It generates energy and cools down the atmosphere helping to reduce the effect of green house gases at the same time.

Would that work and why don't we do it? If not, what are the flaws in this logic?

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  • $\begingroup$ What about work required to create vacuum in the first place? $\endgroup$
    – Deep
    Commented Oct 22, 2017 at 3:33

2 Answers 2

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The boiling water would increase the pressure inside of the tank (which would now start to fill up with water vapor instead of air). You would have to expend energy to continuously pump out this water vapor if you wanted to keep boiling the remaining liquid water. Therefore, you have essentially invented a heat pump: a contraption that takes work input to move heat from a warmer source to a cooler source.

Ultimately,the net effect of this device will not be to cool its surroundings, just to move heat from one place to another (and then generate some additional heat while doing that, due to the work required to keep the vacuum pump operating)

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Put some water in a chamber (metal or dialectric) Get all the air out...

... needs energy for the pump

Water will start boiling and losing temperature

Not really. What you can observe is that gas bubbles get out. The water is a solution for gas and this gas under lower pressure goes into the vacuum.

While it's boiling it produces energy from motion (boiling)

Water boils if you heat it and after this you could release the energy of the vibrating molecules in a next step to another device.

So, sorry, your idea is not realizable.

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