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As both fields follow Superposition Principle, can they be added to get a total field at any region?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Kyle Kanos, stafusa, Jon Custer, heather, David Z Oct 27 '17 at 20:00

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The fields are different. They interact with different substances, so it would not make much sense to mathematically add them.

But gravitational forces and electric forces can be added. For example in Newton's 2nd law. Forces are forces, regardless of their origins. But their origins, in this case the fields, might be fundamentally different.

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  • $\begingroup$ agree with steeven. the key point here is that there's no way to mathematically transform a gravitational field into an electric field. this means, for example, that there is no configuration of electric charges or current flows which yield a gravitational field, and no configuration of uncharged masses which could produce an electric field. Although it would be fun if there was! $\endgroup$ – niels nielsen Oct 21 '17 at 5:19

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