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Do the electromagnetic waves that the human body emit differ depending on the emotional state the person at a given time?

Which leads me to ask if this is true, does this have a impact on the body if it is subjected to negative emotion for a sustained length of time?

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  • $\begingroup$ If they’re angry, their face may heat up, causing more infrared radiation. Anger may have a negative impact on the body but according to all known physics the radiation doesn’t. $\endgroup$ – knzhou Oct 19 '17 at 12:23
  • $\begingroup$ If you get angry your face heats up and turns red. If you get reeeeally angry your face heats up more and turns blue. Srsly, changing body temp does change EM wave emission. Not apparent if negative emotion over a long time will actually change body temp. There are probably short term dips in temp but doubt they last very long. $\endgroup$ – user5419 Oct 19 '17 at 13:10
  • $\begingroup$ This question might be more appropriate at Biology or Medical Sciences, or, if you have a source for the claim that this is true, Skeptics. $\endgroup$ – ACuriousMind Oct 19 '17 at 14:14
  • $\begingroup$ Do you know that type of electromagnetic radiation does the human body emit? And why? $\endgroup$ – Andrei Geanta Oct 19 '17 at 14:18
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As others have said, yes, they do for the reasons already stated. However, I think the OP meant that if I am close to someone with negative emotions all the time, will their electromagnetic field emissions have an effect on me? (Different than if they are happy for example.)

The answer is no. Electromagnetic fields can have an effect on people. For example, transcranial magnetic stimulation is a very real effect that can change your personality, at least for a while after stimulation. However, the fields needed for this effect are relatively strong and need to have very specific properties and localization to produce the desired effects. In another example, get into a giant microwave oven turned on and things will not be pleasant. Once again, the fields must be very large. However, any change in electromagnetic radiation that results from your emotions is extremely small compared to your "background" emissions and to the environment. You also have no specific sense able to detect such changes emitted from people around you.

This is not to say that being with negative people could not be bad for you, but the effects of the electromagnetic field is not the cause. This would be more a question for a psychology forum.

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Yes, they do. The human body acts as a black body. The black-body radiation depends from the temperature. The emotional state of a person changes the temperature of his body parts. Cheeks flushed is an example of this phenomenon.

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Beside the obvious (and often very revealing) infrared from increased body temperature, there are electromagnetic emissions from muscles and the brain.

Muscle potentials (measured with electromyography, EMG) are on the scale of millivolts when measured on the skin. Brain activity (measured with electroencephalography, EEG) produce microvolt potentials. A tense person will have a high muscle tonus and hence produce muscle potentials. Different brain states have characteristic EEG patterns, but they have typically less to do with what feeling the brain experiences and more with the general level of arousal and attention.

Both EMG and EEG are oscillating electrical potential (in the <100 Hz range) so they radiate a bit. However, they are multipoles and hence decay faster than dipole radiation - I would be surprised if they could be detected above the normal electrical noise level from more than a few centimeters away.

Negative emotions do have bad effects on the body, but these are mediated through stress hormones (glucocorticoids) that decrease immune function, memory and other things. The electromagnetic fields have nothing to do with it.

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