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Can bosonic and fermionic condensates explain superfluid and superconducting properties? Are they better than the theory of BCS and Landau?

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My question is based in this lecture pesentation From BEC to CBS. In particular in this slide:

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    $\begingroup$ "Bosonic and fermionic condensates" is not a theory. Until you actually have a theory, your question isn't really answerable. What's more, BCS theory already involves fermionic condensates. $\endgroup$ – Chris Oct 16 '17 at 19:29
  • $\begingroup$ @Chris please, check out my edit. $\endgroup$ – Dinesh Shankar Oct 16 '17 at 19:50
  • $\begingroup$ I still don't understand your question. What two things are you trying to compare? BCS and Landaus theory of super-fluidity are how you describe weak coupling condensates. " bosonic and fermionic condensates" are things with superfluid or superconducting properties (zero viscosity, quantized vortices...) not theories themselves. $\endgroup$ – Shane P Kelly Oct 17 '17 at 0:25
  • $\begingroup$ Did you at least check on Wikipedia the following keywords : Bose-Einstein condensate, Fermi-Dirac degenerate gas, Landau theory of the Fermi liquid, BCS theory of superconductivity, superfluidity ? Your question make no sense at all once you read understand these concepts. If you have difficulties understanding one of these concepts, please ask specific question. $\endgroup$ – FraSchelle Oct 17 '17 at 7:34
  • $\begingroup$ Superfluidity in He^4 is more or less a Bose-Einstein condensate, in He^3 it comes from Cooper pairing of fermions to form a quasi Bose-Einstein condensate. The second order phase transition is responsible for the phenomenology of the superfluid state. A superconductor is a pseudo Bose-Einstein condensate made on top of the Cooper instability in the Fermi gas (also called a metal, this later being described by the Landau theory of the Fermi liquid). The superconducting phenomenology is explained by a Anderson-Higgs phenomenon (the electromagnetic gauge redundancy goes to a smaller group). $\endgroup$ – FraSchelle Oct 17 '17 at 7:38

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