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in Vibroacoustic Therapy (VAT) sound is transferred to skin surface via transducers that are in direct contact with the skin. This means no energy loss to surrounding air. We are mostly using sinusoidal frequences between 30 Hz and 120 Hz. The different organs inside the body are of different density and the sound waves will therefore bounce in different directions and be differently absorbed by the internal organs. We know, empirically, that the effect of the internal sound massage usually is positive , relaxing and stimulating. as the density of different organs are different, sounds will be differently absorbed or penetrating different tissues. Have anyone done research how single cells and their internal structure are reacting to sounds? As acoustics describe auditively perceived sounds, the "endoacoustic" effects must be described by a totally different vocabulary, because we are looking for the medical effects of surface-to-surface transfer of phonons to the human body. Do anyone have ideas of how we can describe the effect of VAT.

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sound waves of that low frequency will not be affected by the position or density or size of the internal organs. for organs to be targeted, the wavelength of the sound must be smaller than the dimensions of the organ. Note also that individual cells in the body that make up those organs are extremely small compared to your wavelengths and so they individually experience only extremely tiny effects when low frequency sound passes through them. those effects would be nearly impossible to measure.

Regarding phonons: the phonon concept only makes sense when describing the response of a crystalline solid to wavelengths of sound that are of similar order to the spacing between individual crystallites, or smaller. It's important on scale lengths where quantum effects become important and not when describing sound wave propagation through macroscopic bodies of varying composition.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank You. try now to imagine a sound wave being composed of phonons. Even if phonons are of 0 mass They may penetrate the cells and the inside of cells, just like a gravitational ripple penetrates everything. i am now thinking of microscopic dimensions. a 40 Hz soundwave consists of phonons. I have seen effects of sound wave vibrations that must come from changes inside organs and, maybe, cells. No one has taken this possible causality seriously, yet. $\endgroup$ – Olav Skille Oct 7 '17 at 7:57
  • $\begingroup$ @OlavSkille If you want to think in terms of phonons, you have to consider how much the phonos interact with the cells. The answer is not very much, for the same reason as user40292 mentioned: the wavelength of the phonon is much larger than that of a cell. 40Hz sound has a wavelength of almost 40 meters in the body. While the size of cells vary, most are smaller than 0.0001 meters wide. You just don't see much coupling with those scales. Conduct some sound at 400kHz, and you might see effects at the cellular level. $\endgroup$ – Cort Ammon Oct 8 '17 at 6:27
  • $\begingroup$ Hello Cort Annon $\endgroup$ – Olav Skille Oct 9 '17 at 15:31
  • $\begingroup$ My main problem is that ishavet beennusing low frequency, low energy sound in my therapy for over 40 years. The effects are remarcable both on muskulær functions, brain functions and hormonal functions. VAT sound is transferred bybditect contact between transducer and body surface. I cannot use the concepts of acoustics of music to explain the changes at cellular level that have been observed. a 40 meter wave in watery substances cannot explain the effect on a broken arm, f.ex. I have left music therapy 20 years ago. Pyhagoras is still acceptable, tough. $\endgroup$ – Olav Skille Oct 9 '17 at 19:29
  • $\begingroup$ user 4092 says that the wavelength of a phonon is smaller than a cell. the phonon has no dimension and no mass, as far as I have read. But still Sunday travek $\endgroup$ – Olav Skille Oct 9 '17 at 19:48

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