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A man conducted "an experiment" (quotes really, really necessary) to prove that earth is flat. Here's a link. He used a spirit level, set it up before takeoff and expected the level to be tilted after landing, becase since the world is round, the destination would be tilted in relation to origin. Well that failed, because gravity works differently than he anticipated.

I'm fairly sure I know the answer, but... What would happen if he had used a gyroscope instead? Wouldn't that work? Wouldn't gyroscope be tilted in relation to Earth's surface after landing?

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  • $\begingroup$ yes it would. Although they tend to drift a bit over time anyway in practice. $\endgroup$
    – JMLCarter
    Commented Sep 30, 2017 at 9:29
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    $\begingroup$ Minor comment to the post (v2): Please consider to mention explicitly author, title, etc. of link, so it is possible to reconstruct link in case of link rot. $\endgroup$
    – Qmechanic
    Commented Sep 30, 2017 at 10:17
  • $\begingroup$ @JMLCarter This is an answer, I think. $\endgroup$
    – user107153
    Commented Sep 30, 2017 at 10:35

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yes it would. Although they tend to drift a bit over time anyway in practice.

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  • $\begingroup$ Especially a ring laser gyroscope or a fiber optic gyroscope. They have basically zero drift compared to mechanical ones, and they now equip all commercial planes. $\endgroup$
    – user154997
    Commented Sep 30, 2017 at 11:56

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