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Has anyone conducted an experiment where two identical atoms, molecule, separated by some distance are entangled using Atomic Electron Transition?

Quantum entanglement is a physical phenomenon that occurs when pairs or groups of particles are generated or interact in ways such that the quantum state of each particle cannot be described independently of the others, even when the particles are separated by a large distance.

Atomic electron transition is a change of an electron from one energy level to another within an atom or artificial atom. It appears discontinuous as the electron "jumps" from one energy level to another in a few nanoseconds or less. It is also known as atomic transition, quantum jump, or quantum leap.

Electron transitions, causes emission or absorption of electromagnetic radiation in the form of quantized units called photons.

If I have atoms at point “A”

Then at a distance I have the same atoms at point “B”

If atoms at point “A” absorbs electron(s) will atoms at point “B” emit photons?

Thank You

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you think it is possible to entangle the entire atom? Even a simple deuterium has DoF and several types of interaction incorporated. How would you ensure the entanglement on the level of nucleons? $\endgroup$ – MsTais Sep 29 '17 at 21:32
  • $\begingroup$ "If atoms at point “A” absorbs electron(s) will atoms at point “B” emit photons?" The answer would be no because that would allow FTL communication. $\endgroup$ – A. C. A. C. Sep 29 '17 at 22:14
  • $\begingroup$ Your question looks unclear, make it more clear. $\endgroup$ – peterh says reinstate Monica Sep 30 '17 at 11:38
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It seems you don't really understand the concept of an atomic transition. This description is reasonably accurate:

Atomic electron transition is a change of an electron from one energy level to another within an atom or artificial atom. It appears discontinuous as the electron "jumps" from one energy level to another in a few nanoseconds or less. It is also known as atomic transition, quantum jump, or quantum leap.

However, it is inconsistent with your later statement

If atoms at point “A” absorbs electron(s),

which is way off-base. Atoms don't "absorb electrons" in the process you described: they start off with a set number of electrons and that number does not increase or decrease throughout the process. The only thing that happens is that the internal arrangement of the electrons inside the atom changes.


That said, the answer to your core question, rephrased as

Are there existing experiments that use electronic transitions to entangle atoms?

is yes. Moreover, this is nowadays a routine procedure carried out all over the world in a variety of contexts.

For a simple example, you can try the Mølmer-Sørensen gate, in the context of atomic ions in an electrostatic ion trap, where you induce an electronic transition in ion A using a laser that's slightly detuned from the center frequency of the transition to entangle the electronic degrees of freedom with the center-of-mass motion, which it shares with ion B because they are trapped together, and then you do the same thing with ion B to get the electronic degrees of freedom entangled.

If you want more examples, look up your favourite quantum-information textbook.

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