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Water is diamagnetic because when oxygen bonds to two hydrogens all electrons are paired off with their magnetic spins cancelling each other out. Does not matter whether the south or north pole is used, water will be repelled. On the other hand, it is also polarized and will be attracted by static electricity. I guess my confusion is how can water be electric balanced in terms of spins but unbalanced in terms of charge?

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Water being diamagnetic, it excludes magnetic field (weakly). This makes repulsion according to the absolute value of the magnetic field (and field direction is unimportant). Water is also ionic (weakly conductive), so excludes electric field. That exclusion, however, is a result of migration of charges to the surface of the water, positive charge being built up on parts of the water surface where electric field lines are out of the water surface, and negative charge where electric field lines are INTO the water surface. Direction is important.

Both those surface charge concentrations put attracted charge near the field source (where intensity is greatest), and are attractive. That might mean (if one surface has more field than the opposite) a net attractive force, or it might just turn a spherical water droplet into a slightly elongated shape, without any net force.

Any material that can generate a small electric polarization will similarly be attracted by a strong-from-one-side electric field; that's how static electricity can pick up specks of pepper, for instance.

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