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If we can make electricity from visible light then why can't we make electricity from all of the EM spectrum? If someone had an antenna or a plate of some sort to attract electromagnetic waves and then connected it to a capacitor and a dielectric and then let voltage siphon of into a battery is some sort, would it work? Or they connected an EM wave anntenna of some sort to a photodiode would that create electricity?

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    $\begingroup$ A en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_radio crystal radio is powered by radio waves, for example. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Sep 25 '17 at 19:15
  • $\begingroup$ The answer is we can, and it's been done in a multitude of ways for years. A lot of solar energy, for example. primarily uses non visible infra-red. $\endgroup$ – JMLCarter Sep 25 '17 at 20:00
  • $\begingroup$ Possibly useful reading: Energy harvesting $\endgroup$ – Alfred Centauri Sep 26 '17 at 1:52
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The vast majority of EM energy comes from the Sun and it peaks in the visible range (probably why our eyes have evolved to be sensitive in this range). In principle we could collect energy from longer or shorter wavelengths but the available power is much less.

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