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Since f=ma, and we derive whatever the force it takes to accelerate a specific mass at a specific acceleration as a unit of force. I understand this ratio of actual force will always be the same in the entire universe but is there a reason why for example 1kg accelerated a 1m/s^2=1 N which is equivalent to .225 pound force. (don't focus so much that I am using pound force my main question is why is the actual force what it is, why not more why not less) This is a such a light force, but what if we didn't know any better and 1 N was equivalent to 100 pounds of force(instead of .225),(could you imagine if it took 100 pounds to accelerate 1kg mass at 1 ms^2) this would mean it would be very hard to accelerate objects and approx 400 x the force we are currently use to would be required to accelerate matter throughout the universe. This would then mean to accelerate a 10 kg object at 10 m/s ^2 would still be 100 N but since we are hypothetically pretending 1 N = 100 pounds this would then mean a 10 kg mass on earth would be 9,800 pounds. Now I know this is all hypothetical but my only question is why is any unit of force what it is for example 1 N is a very light amount of pressure why is the amount of force to accelerate 1 kg 1 m/s^2 not a heavier force or even a much lighter force. Is this just a constant value we "accept" or is there a reason why to break inertia at a specific acceleration equals what it does. Why isn't the force to accelerate 1 kg 1 m/s^2 not more or less then we are currently use to in this universe?. Why is the "actual force" what it is? Why not more why not less?? What if 1 N was very light like 1/100th the actual force it is now this would mean that using the f=ma everything would be 1/100th. But again why is "the actual for what it is". Maybe there is no reason and it is what it is. But that is an answer as well.

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  • $\begingroup$ Is there some specific situation that you have in mind? Essentially since everything else will scale with force there isn't going to a difference. Maybe you are asking specifically if humans were 400× times weaker, or something relating to human experiences. Is there a way to edit the question and make it more concise and specific? $\endgroup$ – ja72 Sep 22 '17 at 23:03
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    $\begingroup$ Not sure where you're going with this. And, without paragraph breaks it is very hard to read. $\endgroup$ – hdhondt Sep 23 '17 at 0:43
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You are essentially redefining mass units. Mass is the conversion factor between force and acceleration. If you increase the value of force holding the acceleration constant, it implies that the mass unit of measurement must be lower by a corresponding factor. The equivalence of inertial mass and gravitational mass is a cornerstone of general relativity.

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