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As I know, light is wave, and a wave is a disturbance moving through a medium. If that's right, when light propagates through water, why doesn't it make an obvious disturbance in water?

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Your question is based on an invalid premise. Not all waves are disturbances in a medium. In particular, the Michelson-Morley experiment demonstrated (or at least strongly suggested what we now know) that light (and other EM) waves don't require a medium to propagate.

At another level, in fact light does produce a kind of disturbance in water, although it's not one we can see directly. As the light waves go through the water (or air or glass or whatever) they tend to polarize the molecules of that material. This leads to an effective reduction in the wave propagation velocity through the medium characterized by the index of refraction of the material.

The different refractive indices of various materials is what allows lenses, prisms, and many other optical devices to work.

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light does propagate through a medium. the electric wave propagates through the magnetic medium and the magnetic wave propagates through the electric medium. since light does not experience time they are both already there. Also the disturbance is seen as heat since the water cannot vibrate as fast as light being that the water actually has mass and the light does not.

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