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From the wave-particle duality we know that the electron can be viewed as both a particle and a wave. One example is that electron can be seen as a standing wave around an atomic nuclei.

What would happen if you used a measurement device that measures the strenght of the electromagnetic field from a hydrogen atom? Would you recive an oscillating signal due to the electron rotating around the nuclei or would it be a constant signal due to the standing wave?

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As the electron occupies an energy state of the system, it cannot lose any energy, so it cannot radiate. No photons coming out meaning no oscillating EM field. Even more the hydrogen atom is neutrally charged so no electric field either (at least if measured outside the atom).

Maybe (I'm not sure) QFT can explain a fluctuating field but it may not be a strict consequence of the orbiting electron.

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