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My thoughts are that this is possible, that is an electron can go from n=2 to n=3 states, however due to such a low probability this is not observed (the electron moves to the ground state as fast as possible so unlikely that it would absorb a photon in that time). Or is this type of transition forbidden?

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    $\begingroup$ All you need is an energy gap that corresponds to a photon energy. Whether that's $E_0$ to $E_1$ or $E_4$ to $E_{94}$ $\endgroup$
    – user95137
    Commented Sep 6, 2017 at 3:18
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    $\begingroup$ @Phase, and allows conservation of momentum. Important when somebody asks why there's no silicon lasers. $\endgroup$
    – The Photon
    Commented Sep 6, 2017 at 4:54

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It's perfectly well allowed, but the n=2 state is often not highly populated, unless there is some process in place to promote electrons from the ground state to n=2. Even when there is, there is often some process that allows the n=2 electrons to return to n=1 fairly quickly, so the pumping of electrons from n=1 to n=2 needs to be maintained to make the n=2 to n=3 transition easy to observe.

This type of process is commonly observed in time-resolved spectroscopy aka "pump-probe spectroscopy".

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As per my study and research it electron jump from one state to another state because of energy. If electron in ground state is provided with external energy then it jumps into higher energy state. So the reason behind changing energy level is due to energy difference not because of external particle either it is photon or any other elementary particles.

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  • $\begingroup$ The basic flaw here is that the energy has to come from somewhere, and where it comes from is the interaction with so outside entity through light. You can talk about light in either classical (wave) or quantum (photon) terms, but light is involved either way. $\endgroup$ Commented Sep 6, 2017 at 15:00

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